FAQ’s

How can TORC help me get my local trail sanctioned?

It’s extremely rare for a bandit trail to become a sanctioned trail. If there is already a trail on a piece of property, there’s a pretty good chance that the landowner knows about it, and is just basically ignoring it. If you know the landowner, you could potentially talk to them about the situation, and see if they would like TORC to help. 

Keep in mind, organizations, neighborhoods and local governments will likely have protocols to follow: public notification and input requirements, facilities to put in like toilets or parking, property assessment, bids and contracts for proper establishment of public trails, etc. 

They may not be willing to do the work, even with TORC’s help. But if they are, you would let us know or tell them how to contact us, and we could get involved. We can manage the project and maintain the trail, but the overall idea is that TORC doesn’t start the process, the property owner does.

Who decides when a trail is closed or opened?

A trail coordinator and/or land manager will provide the official word on trail status. Trail coordinators make decisions on maintenance, fixing trail issues and even building and designing reroutes or new trail. And they are very in tune with the land managers, more so than the public, and only adhere to land managers and TORC leaders regarding major decisions on their respective trail systems.

If you want to know how you can help a Trail Coordinator, find a workday for your local trail on TORC’s meetup page, or simply show up at a work day and ask some questions. 

Why do the trails close so often?

Land managers want to support recreational use of their property but not at the expense of long term ecological and biological impact of their property. So they need dirt surface trails that are built sustainably and designed to last, and not subject to sedimentation in drainage areas and streams/water features.

Three things affect the wearing away of the soil comprising the trail tread. How popular is the trail? How wet is the trail? How old is the trail? The first two questions combined, greatly affect the trail tread. TORC is cognizant of those two combined factors and have decided to reduce those unsustainable conditions by closing down the trails when trail tread is saturated. Our reputation for sustainable trails, and responsible riders, helps when advocating with potential land owners/managers for new projects and new trails.

Another factor is parking lots with gates. Land managers don’t want to wait for a parking lot to empty when a trail is closed so they can close the gate. So they are more likely to close a trail early, at the first sign of rain. 

My kid loves mountain biking, is there a club for kids?

You should contact your local NICA team. It’s for middle and high school aged kids. If your child is too young, they may be able to connect you with other parents of similarly aged kids for unsanctioned group rides in your area. http://www.northcarolinamtb.org/league-map/

How do I volunteer to work on a trail?

You’ll need to follow our group on meetup to get notifications about upcoming workdays, and you pick the ones you can join. Trail coordinators don’t typically reach out to potential volunteers although you can DM the host of a workday through meetup. The host is frequently a trail coordinator. https://www.meetup.com/torc-nc/events/

Does TORC have a marketplace to purchase, trade or sell used bikes or equipment?

There are a few places on the forum that’s hosted by TriangleMTB where you could ask, and shop: Want To Buy or Trade and Bikes and Frames For Sale

I have some old lumber / rock / etc. to donate. Would you like it?

We gladly accept materials that are in good condition. Probably not old deck boards for example. Let us know what you have to donate and we’ll see if there’s a need.

Can I ride my e-bike on the trails? 

The land managers or land owners make the rules, so be sure to confirm before riding.